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Man bound, beaten, and gagged in home

Man bound, beaten, and gagged in home

Left to right: Barnhill, Harper, Allen

ClarksvilleNow.com Reporting
news@clarksvillenow.com

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. – A man told police he was kidnapped and held inside a home Monday, Oct. 28.

According to Officer Natalie Hall with the Clarksville Police Department (CPD), officers received a 911 call around 7:15 p.m., and the victim said he had been held captive since 1 p.m. The man had been bound, beaten, and gagged. He eventually escaped through a window and ran to another home for help.

Police obtained a search warrant for 3460 Kingfisher Dr., and following an investigation three suspects have been identified and are wanted for aggravated kidnapping and aggravated robbery. The suspects are as follows:

Roger Weems Harper (D.O.B.: 12/14/87), black male, 6’, 180 pounds, black hair, brown eyes. Last known address: 1751 Ashland City Road Apt. Q-139, Clarksville (PICTURED IN CENTER)

Troy Amir Allen (D.O.B.: 10/09/90), black male, 5’9”, 225 pounds, black hair, brown eyes. Last known address: 260 Indiana Ave., Ft. Campbell, Ky. (PICTURED ON RIGHT)

Matthew Jerard Barnhill (D.O.B.: 6/22/90), black male, 5’9”, 350 pounds, black hair, brown eyes. Last known address: 108 A Medical Court, Clarksville (PICTURED ON LEFT)

Anyone with information is asked to contact Detective Kagan Dindar at 931-648-0656 or Crime Stoppers at 931-645-TIPS (8477).

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